All posts tagged: Greek

picky toddler: greek foods that don’t go to the dog

My dear friend A, who lived on a Greek island for 20 years, where daily she tended a fabulous fruit and vegetable garden so skillfully that we named her Lara Crop, left it all behind to move to the US. One day, beyond disbelief, she Skyped me to tearfully announce that lemons there cost a dollar apiece and were all GMO. It was then that I was struck with the realization that despite the crappy crisis and many other problematic issues in this country, we are at least fortunate enough to live in a place where neighbours with country houses will actually try to force bags of garden-grown, organic lemons on you so they don’t have to watch them rot in a pile. Here, we are still lucky enough (but for how long, I don’t know) to have access to rich varieties of non-GMO, healthy and delectable, locally-grown foods; saying that, the majority of fruit & veg is heavily sprayed so one has to seek out the organically grown stuff, and even then there’s the issue …

Q&A: matt barrett, greece travel guru

Matt Barrett is a legend amongst travellers and wannabe visitors to Greece. His website Greece Travel Guide, has been offering readers valuable insider advice, quirky information and an in-depth understanding of Greece through the eyes of an American Grecophile since 1996. His writing and content is coloured with a warm, friendly and humorous personal touch, is completely unpretentious and seriously useful. Shortly after he had started his website I wrote a piece about Matt for The Athens News titled ‘Matt Barrett For Mayor of Athens‘ (in which he shared some of his story), and the insanely brilliant idea of him running the Greek capital continues to linger in my mind (and in that of thousands of his fans) today. I have written and continue to write for Matt and am honoured to host his answers to our Q&A here on My Greek Review, which has definitely been inspired by all the great things that Matt is providing to readers throughout the years and continues to offer today. His last answer here says it all… How Greek are you? My grandfather and grandmother on my father’s side came …

class-leading sauvignon blanc

SAUVIGNON Blanc is ubiquitous. Though it does not scale the heights of Riesling, Chenin Blanc, or Assyrtiko, it scores high in awakening one’s senses. It brilliantly matches oysters and other metallic- iodine-tasting shellfish. Passes the goat-cheese salad test. It’s pungently aromatic and crisp, with rare exceptions it fails to deliver the middle part of the story, though. Yet, its popularity grows by the mouthful. It has the knack to remind you of its presence. An actor delivering fireworks in the first act but lacking the firing power and stamina to enthrall his audience through to the end. Old vines carry wisdom. They go a long way in covering up imperfections. In fewer words, they say more. I recently advocated that the way forward for Amyndeon is the micro-parcel route. Thanks to its sandy-clay topsoil lying on limestone bedrock, there are nuances to explore. Droumo was planted in 1990. It is one of the earliest of its kind. Moreover, it is in the right microclimate. With no maritime influence from the Ionian or Aegean, this 550-700m landlocked …

forget me…not!

WHEN you traipse through the city’s historical zone perusing souvenir shops – Monastiraki, Plaka and Acropolis, in a desperate last-minute hunt for a decent gift for your loved ones back home, you’ll come across a range of things you keep seeing over and over like a hellish design nightmare: tacky T-shirts, featuring various scenes and lines from the movie 300, quotes by ancient philosophers, ancient scenes of all varieties (sometimes with a lewd sexual twist) and those with nudge-nudge, wink, wink references to drunkenness. An assortment of classical statues through the historical ages in all shapes, sizes and materials. The ancient warrior headgear, spears, armour plates, dinner plates, “hand painted” bowls, jugs and other vessels. ‘I love Greece’ bags, island donkey-lovers trinkets and cat-starring toys, off the shoulder cotton dresses with gold stitching inspired by the Greek gods that the Greek gods wouldn’t be seen dead in, orgy themed playing cards. There are also  new age / hippy / traveller uniforms, bags, ruck sacks and sarongs and then sandals, lots of sandals. And that’s all folks. That’s until you may be as …

ikarian lessons on food and life

IKARIA, Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity from the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die, is US-raised Diane Kochilas‘ latest treasure-trove of recipes about her parents’ native island. The recipes and research in the book are gathered throughout her life, but what breathes life into the book is her first-person account, her true understanding of the island’s social and cultural history and her insider’s knowledge of Ikaria’s secrets. When Kochilas first set foot on Ikaria in the early 1970’s as a 12 year-old New York kid who was “inured to sticky urban summers, insipid American food, and strict curfews” she immediately felt at home with the people,  their sense of freedom and joie de vivre and the lifestyle of the place Greeks even today call “the island of exile”. In recent history Ikaria has become wold famous since it was named as one of the Blue Zones,® a term coined by the Belgian demographer Dr. Michel Poulain, who together with Dr. Gianni Pes of the University of Sassari in Italy and Dan Buettner, author of the book The Blue Zones, have been studying the planet’s pockets of …