All posts tagged: Greece

picky toddler: greek foods that don’t go to the dog

My dear friend A, who lived on a Greek island for 20 years, where daily she tended a fabulous fruit and vegetable garden so skillfully that we named her Lara Crop, left it all behind to move to the US. One day, beyond disbelief, she Skyped me to tearfully announce that lemons there cost a dollar apiece and were all GMO. It was then that I was struck with the realization that despite the crappy crisis and many other problematic issues in this country, we are at least fortunate enough to live in a place where neighbours with country houses will actually try to force bags of garden-grown, organic lemons on you so they don’t have to watch them rot in a pile. Here, we are still lucky enough (but for how long, I don’t know) to have access to rich varieties of non-GMO, healthy and delectable, locally-grown foods; saying that, the majority of fruit & veg is heavily sprayed so one has to seek out the organically grown stuff, and even then there’s the issue …

Greece on a Plate

What does Greece taste like to the most successful Greek-origin chefs in the world? By Alexia Amvrazi Chef Michael Psilakis Award-winning chef Michael Psilakis owns the lauded Kefi, MP Taverna, The Hall at MP and Fishtag restaurants in the US for which he has received numerous accolades, including the James Beard Award and a Michelin Star. His book How To Roast A Lamb was received with great aplomb for its heartening references to comforting Greek foods and earned him several TV appearances and articles in major publications. MOST EVOCATIVE TASTE & AROMA OF GREECE: Lemon. The bright acidity it provides is the basis of why the simplicity of Greek cuisine is so brilliant. Every bite starts anew when the lemony finish cleanses the palate and prepares the taste buds to experience subtle nuances, as if it were the first bite. FAVORITE GREEK FOOD TO EAT RAW: Sea urchin, cracked on the rocks, rinsed in the ocean, with a squeeze of lemon, salt… equals heaven. IT’S WORTH DEDICATING HOURS TO COOK…: Live fire, spit-roasted lamb, embodies the …

Forget IKEA – Egneus is Sweden’s loveliest gift to Greece

Daniel Egneus made a colorful splash on the Athens art scene last summer with his exhibition of 100 drawings of Athens streets at the Zoumboulakis Gallery, titled ‘As I Walked Out One Morning’. His juxtaposition of vivid, fantastical and beatific elements with gritty, harsh or eerie characteristics is a common thread in his work, displaying a complex and profound perspective about people and the urban or natural worlds they inhabit, both materially and figuratively. In only four years of living in Athens, following decades in a string of other European cities, Egneus has created hundreds of paintings, sketches andillustrations that, critically, attest to an impressively illustrated and highly original perspective of the city. I interviewed the artist on a rainy day in his apartment at the border between Syntagma and Plaka, sitting at his desk to take a privileged look through a lot of his work on giant screens and sipping tea that took him several attempts to make, because of a temperamental kettle it seems. Let’s start at the very beginning… I quit school really early. All …

in search of an honest man BY adrian vrettos

ONE OF my all-time heroes is Diogenes the Cynic, who spent most of his life chilling out in his barrel outside the city-state of Corinth . He was the original Cynic because he believed that men and women lived a life dictated by rules and taboos and therefore no one was really truthful or honest. Actually Diogenes is my hero because he was witty, rude, and had little respect for authority. For example, when Alexander the Great rode down to visit Diogenes in his barrel, he offered Diogenes any gift of his choice. With a scowl, Diogenes snapped back his response: “What you’ve taken away, you can never give me.” “Huh?” said Alex. “You’re standing in my sun.” What most people know about Diogenes is that he wandered around ancient Greece carrying a lantern and searching for an honest man. In Plaka you can find the figures of him and his lantern and Rataplan, his mangy mutt. What most people don’t know is why he went searching for an honest man when he believed, as a …

female scientists wanted!

GIVING girls the green light to explore, discover, enjoy and master science is Melissa Rancourt’s   biggest goal, and she herself has been surprised to discover how much help has come along the way in developing her project, and how very enthusiastic girls have been to take part in it throughout the world. The international organisation is volunteer-run, and has gathered a significant number of interns, “ambassadors”, teachers and other helpful individuals who support its projects, messages and initiatives in various ways. With the affirmative mantra of “anything is possible!”, girls of a school age are encouraged to pursue STEM subjects – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – while having a really great time, and realising that the sciences are just as much about reasoning and logic as they are about creativity and resourcefulness. Girls are encouraged from young ages to see that despite the field of science today being mainly male-dominated, (regardless that there have been a good amount of awesome female scientist predecessors rocking the science world in history), they too can play a significant role and turn things around in …

gather ye writers…on andros

BY GUEST WRITER DIANA FARR LOUIS For the past 13 years the Aegean Arts Circle has been a constant fixture on the island of Andros. Undaunted by Greece’s ups and downs, Amalia Melis, Greek-American writer and artist from New York, keeps bringing award-winning authors there to help less experienced writers polish their skills and find their voice. Every summer a select group generates a unique environment of trust, dedication and focus that produces fine, publishable prose and lasting inspiration. As a measure of the success of these workshops, some people return again and again for that buzz of intense excitement that occurs when creative juices start flowing and words spill out onto page or screen with a force and confidence you had only dreamed of. Amalia’s recipe of morning meetings with exercises and critiques of a single participant’s chosen text, a poolside lunch or swim, free afternoons, and a delicious dinner under the stars rarely fails to elicit your best writing while fostering friendships in the process. I know. I’ve attended three Aegean Arts Circle …

I have nothing to wear!

UNLESS you’re one of those people who have a walk-in wardrobe that looks like Vogue’s September Issue clothing department, you’ll have experienced, at least once in a while, and at most, every other day, that disempowering, frustrating, downright infuriating feeling that you have nothing to wear. There you are, looking at a wardrobe full of clothes, yet in your mind’s eye there’s something absolutely wrong with every single item. You may start by calmly perusing your lot, and then move on to a more active searching mode. Oh, there’s that shirt you wore the other day and felt so good in! Why not match it with those funky trousers? You thrown them on, and are faced with your frowning, frumpy reflection: “I look like crap!” Suddenly the shirt makes you look lumpy and the trousers are far too tight on your bum, not to mention that your legs look like those of a miniature horse. How did you ever even wear these trousers? Or buy them? They’re terrible! In fact, everything you own is terrible! For a moment …

the notebook (greek edition)

MIRIAM Beard wrote: “Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.” Richard Clark, an English writer and journalist who has dedicated a lot of his life on writing about Greece, would tend to strongly agree with that thought, as he feels that the country has created some profound changes in him. He first visited Greece in 1982, when he went to live in Heraklion on Crete to work as a teacher. Since leaving the island to work for the BBC in London, he has returned on many occasions, now visiting the islands at least three times a year. He has written six books, Crete – A Notebook (two editions), Corfu – A Notebook, Rhodes – A Notebook, The Greek Islands – A Notebook and Richard Clark’s Greek Islands Anthology a Greek translation of his Crete book will be out later this year. Richard is married and has two grown up children and lives in Kent in the UK. How Greek are you? As far as …

celebrating ecotourism in greece

MAINLAND Greece’s stunningly varied, rich and awesomely voluptious natural allure is still not as widely recognised or appreciated internationally as its famous island beaches, welcoming peoples and succulent cuisine. Tourists, over the last decade, have begun to realise and rejoice that there is a great deal more to do during a Greek holiday than bask in the sun and drink ouzo, and that vacationing in Greece doesn’t need to be a summer plan. German tourists were probably the first to start visiting Greece on camping and hiking holidays since the ’70s, and one can still see them today parked in their camper van overloooking some scenic mountain or rugged beach, only today they are joined by visitors of all nationalities doing the same thing. By now Greece has set up enough infrastructure around the country to welcome demanding holidaymakers who seek professional quality experience in their guides, equipment, accommodations and facilities when coming here to climb mountains, go rafting and kayaking, paragliding, skiing and horseback riding to name but a few activities to be enjoyed here year round and in …

a chat with ‘lonesome jorge’

AS A child living in an isolated country town in Australia, Jorge Sotirios  was often fascinated by daring explorers who went to far flung places like ‘The Amazon’, ‘The Galapagos’ and ‘The Moon’. In his humorous, colourful and well received first novel, Lonesome George, C’est Moi! he managed to travel to all three. My Greek Review caught up with the author for an Athens-Sydney conversation. Sotirios has been closely following the Greek situation over the years, coming over from Australia for intense research and exploratory travel through the dense Greek socio-political jungle. He is currently preparing his new novel Graffiti Over Marble which relates to the past, present and future of crisis-struck Greece. My Greek Review: What has most inspired your love of travel? Jorge Sotirios: The truth is my uncles in Greece went around the world as officers on cruise ships, so their tales of ‘other places’ inspired me (they loved New Zealand the most strangely, but that happens when romance is a given). As a travel journalist I’ve been fortunate to spend ample time in South …