All posts filed under: shopping

I have nothing to wear!

UNLESS you’re one of those people who have a walk-in wardrobe that looks like Vogue’s September Issue clothing department, you’ll have experienced, at least once in a while, and at most, every other day, that disempowering, frustrating, downright infuriating feeling that you have nothing to wear. There you are, looking at a wardrobe full of clothes, yet in your mind’s eye there’s something absolutely wrong with every single item. You may start by calmly perusing your lot, and then move on to a more active searching mode. Oh, there’s that shirt you wore the other day and felt so good in! Why not match it with those funky trousers? You thrown them on, and are faced with your frowning, frumpy reflection: “I look like crap!” Suddenly the shirt makes you look lumpy and the trousers are far too tight on your bum, not to mention that your legs look like those of a miniature horse. How did you ever even wear these trousers? Or buy them? They’re terrible! In fact, everything you own is terrible! For a moment …

it’s kale-tastyc!

PRODUCT REVIEW ADMITTEDLY I’m already into health foods, thus I don’t need to be converted. I’m also very open minded and experimental when it comes to trying new foods, as long as it’s not the live red ant curry I was offered in the Cambodian countryside or the squelchy cooked lamb’s brains I almost passed out watching someone else noisily suck out of the poor animal’s skull. So this isn’t a post about someone who suddenly discovers the amazing attributes of a vegetable she previously considered healthy but nondescript; in fact, when I heard that Troo Food Liberation (TFL), a cooking & raw/vegan awareness-raising team I’ve been a big fan of for years now, had produced their own Kale Chips, I was excited to try them out.    My love of healthy, bio, ethical foods and years of self-experimentation with the effects and energies of foods, as well as my job as a journalist, at some point naturally led me to hooking up with the Troo Food team, who are unique in what they do in Greece, as well …

bio-diversity in the pantry

OVER the years I have become increasingly fascinated by the effect of foods on my organism, and deeply committed to eating right, opting for fresh, seasonal produce, mainly vegetarian, chiefly locally sourced and ethically grown, which offers my body clean, high-nutrient fuel. I found that once I started eating this way, not only was I contributing to a kinder, more compassionate way of life that supported local farmers and food producers, but also making the most of my eating experiences by really getting the most nutritious value out of what I was eating. Once I started consciously cutting out all the foods that are filled with preservatives, GMO ingredients and the ugly cost of involving animal abuse or human slavery (today that unfortunately defines the majority of corporation-produced foods you’ll find in your local store, anywhere in the world), it was fascinating to see the way my body responded  by thanking me – offering better energy, better quality of sleep, better digestion,  and guiding me to choose some foods over others. It started to react immediately to chemically-laden rubbish foods and drinks …

renovation and innovation @ philos

ATHENS is full of beautiful neoclassical buildings that have been abandoned and left to rot. Some of them belong to the state, others to families that were once rich but today cannot afford to refurbish them, or who are still wrangling on ownership rights over what they inherited from their ancestors, among other reasons. Fortunately, one of those beautiful buildings, standing on 32 Solonos St in Kolonaki, was “rescued” by a couple who have what they describe as an “obsession for old buildings”, and transformed into a space that can be visited and enjoyed by all.        The building in question is a 300 square metre, three storey house that has been registered in architectural records since circa 1937 (but is thought by some to have existed since before 1900), that once belonged to an art collector from the island of Mytilini called Evripidis Koutlidis. “It was love at first sight,” the female member of the couple, who prefer to remain anonymous to the press, told us.  After years of searching for “the one”, the pair found the …

forget me…not!

WHEN you traipse through the city’s historical zone perusing souvenir shops – Monastiraki, Plaka and Acropolis, in a desperate last-minute hunt for a decent gift for your loved ones back home, you’ll come across a range of things you keep seeing over and over like a hellish design nightmare: tacky T-shirts, featuring various scenes and lines from the movie 300, quotes by ancient philosophers, ancient scenes of all varieties (sometimes with a lewd sexual twist) and those with nudge-nudge, wink, wink references to drunkenness. An assortment of classical statues through the historical ages in all shapes, sizes and materials. The ancient warrior headgear, spears, armour plates, dinner plates, “hand painted” bowls, jugs and other vessels. ‘I love Greece’ bags, island donkey-lovers trinkets and cat-starring toys, off the shoulder cotton dresses with gold stitching inspired by the Greek gods that the Greek gods wouldn’t be seen dead in, orgy themed playing cards. There are also  new age / hippy / traveller uniforms, bags, ruck sacks and sarongs and then sandals, lots of sandals. And that’s all folks. That’s until you may be as …

shopping for action aid

             SINCE the Spring of 2014, Action Aid Hellas opened its first store in Greece, just round the corner from the Acropolis metro station’s Dyionissiou Aeropagitou exit, on Veikou St in the Koukaki neighbourhood. ActionAid International brings together its work against poverty, co-ordinated by its International Secretariat, based in Johannesburg, South Africa. They work with over 15 million people in 45 countries. The organisation’s manifesto is to “focus on the people that others forget. People in poverty. People who face discrimination. People whose voices are ignored.” Women’s rights, climate change, countries facing major conflicts and all their humanitarian consequences, HIV and Aids, food and land rights, education and youth are amongst the chief areas that Action Aid addresses. The store, which has “make a stopover, create change” as its motto, is welcoming and polished, with friendly staff and selling a colourful variety of ethnic and local products. Clothing promoting the organisation, accessories such as jewellery, decor items, books and notebooks, handcrafted objects from around the world and food items grace its shelves.   …