All posts filed under: books

lighting up the stars

Osteopath and holistic therapist Vicky Vlachonis stays true to her Greek roots, dynamically advocating holistic practices ancient and new and changing lives via her book, talks & 1-on-1 sessions. “Everybody has pain. We’ve all felt pain in our heart, stomach, shoulder, head” says Vicky Vlachonis, author of the book ‘The Body Doesn’t Lie’ and osteopath to the sparkliest stars in the Hollywood sky. “Pain is the most powerful tool we have, if only we listen to the signals our body gives us. That’s why I wrote the book and have offered a three-step, pain-free program based on Reflect, Release and Radiate.” When we meet, Vicky is tanned after her Greek island family holiday, and positively radiant – clearly she practices what she preaches. It’s been over 20 years since I last saw her at our school, where I remember her as a very sporty, vibrant and charming teenager. I am excited that she has forged such an energetic path in my favorite area of all – holistic wellness, helping thousands of people awaken to the …

gather ye writers…on andros

BY GUEST WRITER DIANA FARR LOUIS For the past 13 years the Aegean Arts Circle has been a constant fixture on the island of Andros. Undaunted by Greece’s ups and downs, Amalia Melis, Greek-American writer and artist from New York, keeps bringing award-winning authors there to help less experienced writers polish their skills and find their voice. Every summer a select group generates a unique environment of trust, dedication and focus that produces fine, publishable prose and lasting inspiration. As a measure of the success of these workshops, some people return again and again for that buzz of intense excitement that occurs when creative juices start flowing and words spill out onto page or screen with a force and confidence you had only dreamed of. Amalia’s recipe of morning meetings with exercises and critiques of a single participant’s chosen text, a poolside lunch or swim, free afternoons, and a delicious dinner under the stars rarely fails to elicit your best writing while fostering friendships in the process. I know. I’ve attended three Aegean Arts Circle …

the notebook (greek edition)

MIRIAM Beard wrote: “Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.” Richard Clark, an English writer and journalist who has dedicated a lot of his life on writing about Greece, would tend to strongly agree with that thought, as he feels that the country has created some profound changes in him. He first visited Greece in 1982, when he went to live in Heraklion on Crete to work as a teacher. Since leaving the island to work for the BBC in London, he has returned on many occasions, now visiting the islands at least three times a year. He has written six books, Crete – A Notebook (two editions), Corfu – A Notebook, Rhodes – A Notebook, The Greek Islands – A Notebook and Richard Clark’s Greek Islands Anthology a Greek translation of his Crete book will be out later this year. Richard is married and has two grown up children and lives in Kent in the UK. How Greek are you? As far as …

a chat with ‘lonesome jorge’

AS A child living in an isolated country town in Australia, Jorge Sotirios  was often fascinated by daring explorers who went to far flung places like ‘The Amazon’, ‘The Galapagos’ and ‘The Moon’. In his humorous, colourful and well received first novel, Lonesome George, C’est Moi! he managed to travel to all three. My Greek Review caught up with the author for an Athens-Sydney conversation. Sotirios has been closely following the Greek situation over the years, coming over from Australia for intense research and exploratory travel through the dense Greek socio-political jungle. He is currently preparing his new novel Graffiti Over Marble which relates to the past, present and future of crisis-struck Greece. My Greek Review: What has most inspired your love of travel? Jorge Sotirios: The truth is my uncles in Greece went around the world as officers on cruise ships, so their tales of ‘other places’ inspired me (they loved New Zealand the most strangely, but that happens when romance is a given). As a travel journalist I’ve been fortunate to spend ample time in South …

the expat novelist

I HAVE been caught in the middle of a protest and a riot. I have faced culture clashes, language barriers and have been surrounded by a headlining economic crisis and social unrest. Thanks to Greece, I also discovered a creative side to myself, inspired by the beauty of the country, a beauty that requires living here to be discovered. It all started with a move across the Atlantic. BY MARISSA TEJADA I had followed my husband from San Francisco to Athens, Greece. A New Yorker, born in Brooklyn, raised on Long Island, I graduated from a college in Upstate New York and then followed my television, journalism and PR career to cities in Washington State, Florida and then California. While I was used to making a new start, I never had to do it in a foreign country. I quit my job. Left my friends and family and I was set on discovering, understanding and finding the best in the experiences that would come my way. One experience ended up being my marriage, which was falling apart. I had to …

Q&A: daphne kapsali, writer

London girl Daphne Kapsali created quite the buzz when she raised some £3,240 pledged of £2,500 goal via a Kickstarter campaign, to live on the Cycladic island of Sifnos to write her novel. Here she answer’s My Greek Review Q&A to give us a glimpse as to where she’s at now. It appears her reclusive lifestyle has not yet adversely affected her… How Greek are you? As Greek as they come. Although I have this theory that we’re all completely mixed, and distinctions such as race and nationality are largely redundant. Or should be! What is your biggest role in life? To be a good writer; to write things that touch people’s lives, in some small way. And to be a positive and supportive presence in the lives that cross mine. What is most important to you right now? To finish the novel I’m writing, and to spend time with the people I love. I’ve just spent six months living alone on the small island of Sifnos, engaged in a project I called 100 days of solitude (a daily …

ikarian lessons on food and life

IKARIA, Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity from the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die, is US-raised Diane Kochilas‘ latest treasure-trove of recipes about her parents’ native island. The recipes and research in the book are gathered throughout her life, but what breathes life into the book is her first-person account, her true understanding of the island’s social and cultural history and her insider’s knowledge of Ikaria’s secrets. When Kochilas first set foot on Ikaria in the early 1970’s as a 12 year-old New York kid who was “inured to sticky urban summers, insipid American food, and strict curfews” she immediately felt at home with the people,  their sense of freedom and joie de vivre and the lifestyle of the place Greeks even today call “the island of exile”. In recent history Ikaria has become wold famous since it was named as one of the Blue Zones,® a term coined by the Belgian demographer Dr. Michel Poulain, who together with Dr. Gianni Pes of the University of Sassari in Italy and Dan Buettner, author of the book The Blue Zones, have been studying the planet’s pockets of …

blue skies and black olives

  IN BLUE Skies and Black Olives: A Survivor’s Tale of Housebuilding and Peacock Chasing in Greece (2009), Britain’s legendary BBC journalist / “national treasure” John Humphrys writes a  first person account along with his son Christopher about his frightful, and often hysterically funny adventure of setting up a holiday home in Greece. The father-son team write in turn, each giving the story their own individual colour and texture with their very different voices. As the true story evolves, the reader gains an insight into their individual characters and lives, the sometimes complex meanderings of their father-son rapport, as well as a fly on the wall perspective of their exciting but often intensely daunting task of getting John Humphry’s Greek home away from home standing upright. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing Christopher since the ’90s and have admired his talent as an acclaimed cellist with the Athens Camerata (Friends of Music Orchestra), the Athens Concert Hall’s multi-award winning ensemble of talented musicians. He is witty, down to earth, and often far too modest about his many …